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  • Blog
  • 10/03/16

Print Processes


Print Processes Cutture

Laser Cutting

What is it?

A high powered laser is used to cut through a variety of materials, from paper and card to Perspex and wood. Artwork is drawn up as laser ready vector files which direct the lasers to cut intricate shapes and illustrations.

Key features

Able to cut a wide variety of materials
A high level of intricacy and detail is obtainable
Short and long runs possible
Options of personalisation for each run

 


Print Processes Cutture

Laser Engraving

As with laser cutting a high powered laser is used, but in this case to engrave the surface of a given material with your design. The finish is very much dependent on the material being engraved, but the top layer of material is being etched away by the laser to leave a unique and tactile finish.

Key features

Able to engrave onto a wide variety of surfaces
Short and long runs possible
Options of personalisation for each run


Print Processes Cutture

Screen Printing

What is it?

Screen printing, or silk-screen printing, is a stencil technique whereby emulsion is used to block out areas of a screen only allowing ink to permeate where your design will be printed. One ink colour is printed per screen, with the option to layer up several screens of different colours to create a full-coloured design, with the possibility of overlapping inks creating new shades.

Key features

Opaque print onto any colour surface
Inks mixed to match desired colour
Metallic inks available
Single colour per screen
Large print areas possible
Able to print onto very heavy weight stocks


Print Processes Cutture

Foil Blocking

What is it?

Foil blocking, also known as foil printing or foil stamping, involves first creating a die of your artwork which is essentially a stamp. The die is then heated and used to pick up foil before transferring to the required stock/surface. Pressure is often applied during this process to create an impression on the print surface giving a beautiful and tactile finish.

Key features

Opaque print onto any colour surface
Metallic and matte foils available in a vast array of colours
Single colour per pass on the press
Deboss can be created in the same pass
Typically used to print smaller areas
Able to print onto very heavy weight stocks


Print Processes Cutture

Letterpress

What is it?

Ink is applied to plates etched with your design which are then used to print and deboss your design into a given stock. Thicker, softer stocks can be used to create wonderfully tactile deep debossed finishes.

Key features

Semi-opaque print onto any colour surface
Inks mixed to match desired colour
Metallic inks available
Single colour per pass on the press
Deep debossed finishes achievable
Able to print onto very heavy weight stocks


Print Processes Cutture

Blind Embossing

What is it?

Blind embossing involves first creating a die of your artwork which is essentially a reversed stamp. Blind embossing uses a combination of heat and pressure, without the addition of foil or ink, to push stock into the die resulting in a particularly tactile raised finish.

Key features

Created without ink to leave an elegant and subtle finish
Embossing leaves raised design area
Typically used with smaller artwork areas


Print Processes Cutture

Digital Printing

What is it?

Typically the most cost effective process for very small runs and fast turnarounds. Either toner or ink-jet technology is used to print full colour cmyk flat images and designs.

Key features

Cost effective for shorter runs
Fast turnaround
Full colour print in single pass
Not available with metallic inks
Stock weight limited to around 350gsm


Print Processes Cutture

Lithography

What is it?

Typically most suitable for larger print runs of the same design in full colour cmyk, plus spot colour Pantone and metallics. Ink is transferred from plate to rubber blanket to stock resulting in a flat, sharp finish.

Key features

Particularly cost effective for longer runs
Full colour cmyk
Spot colour and metallic inks available
Stock weight limited to around 350gsm


Print Processes Cutture

Die-stamping / Engraving

What is it?

Engraving involves first creating a steel die of your artwork which is used to hold ink. Paper is then pressed against the die at great pressure resulting in an embossed effect so that the printed area will be raised and the reverse side of the stock will have a slight indentation.

Key features

Opaque print onto any colour surface
Inks mixed to match desired colour
Metallic inks available
Single colour per pass on the press
Sharp embossed finish
Able to print onto heavy weight stocks


Print Processes Cutture

Thermography

What is it?

An alternative to engraving using powder which adheres to ink avoiding the need for a die. Print is then heated causing the powdered ink to raise giving an embossed effect to the finish to the front without the indentation to the reverse.

Key features

Spot colour and metallic inks available
Embossed effect finish
Able to print onto heavy weight stocks